ST. LOUIS, MO, (SLFP.com) – The Saint Louis Art Museum has opened the Grace Taylor Broughton Sculpture Garden, installed with masterworks from the collection and more than 450 new trees, including hornbeam and serviceberry planted in a tight grid pattern.

The transformative project immediately south of the museum was made possible by a generous gift of $5 million from Barbara B. Taylor, president of the Saint Louis Art Museum Board of Commissioners, and Andrew C. Taylor, executive chairman of St. Louis-based Enterprise Holdings, Inc.

In a release, Barbara Taylor said, “Andy and I take great pleasure in supporting the Saint Louis Art Museum’s vision of connecting visitors with worldclass sculpture in a distinctive way. This new sculpture garden will be a beautiful and significant addition to the Museum, as well as to Forest Park.”

Works in the Museum’s collection, including sculpture by Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Aristide Maillol, and Mathias Gasteiger, which complement Stone Sea, a work by Andy Goldsworthy commissioned by the Museum in 2012.

The new garden completes the phased landscape plan designed by Paris-based Michel Desvigne in concert with Sir David Chipperfield’s design of the Art Museum’s East Building, which opened in summer 2013.

Honored with the Medal of the French Academy of Architecture (2000) the French national Urbanism Grand Prize (2011), Desvigne’s landscape projects include Millennium Park in London’s Greenwich Peninsula, Luxemburg’s Dra├» Eechelen Park, and the New Qatar National Museum in Doha.

The East Building, designed by Sir David Chipperfield, at the Saint Louis Art Museum, features floor-to-ceiling windows and 23 monumental panels of dark polished concrete, with highlights of Missouri river aggregates.
Crusader King Louis IX in front of the Saint Louis Art Museum


The Saint Louis Art Museum is one of the leading art museums with more than 100 galleries. The building was designed by famed architect Cass Gilbert as the Palace of Fine Arts for the 1904 World’s Fair in Forest Park. Standing atop Art Hill, it is the “crown” jewel” of the 1,370-acre park. The Grand Basin is the lake at the foot of Art Hill and served as the focal point of the 1904 World’s Fair.

The Museum’s collections feature more than 30,000 art treasures from ancient times to the present. Highlights include art of the Renaissance, masterpieces of Impressionism, American European Art, Asian art, Period Rooms, the Egyptian mummy, and world-renowned collections of pre-Columbian and German Expressionist art.

The Museum provided $10 million for improvements to Art Hill and nearby areas including: reconstruction of Fine Arts Drive in the front of the Museum between the front stairway and the statue of St. Louis; the street and the area around the landmark statue is now paved with granite; construction of two curved, tree-lined walkways, or promenades, extending about 250 yards in each direction from the statue of St. Louis to the existing circular parking areas; construction of scenic overlooks near the expanded circular parking areas; landscaping of the two promenades and of the entire area with ornamental trees and decorative lighting; and new parking adjacent to the scenic overlooks.

Hours: Tuesday-Sunday, 10:00 am-5:00 pm; Friday, 10:00 am-9:00 pm; Closed Monday. For more information, call 314-721-0072. Admission to the Saint Louis Art Museum is free. Admission to featured exhibitions is free on Friday.