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Design Students Compete to Brighten Chrysler Brand
ST. LOUIS, MO, (SLFP.com), January 31, 2014 - The National Association for Surface Finishing (NASF) has launched its 13th Annual Bright Design Challenge with Master of Fine Arts Transportation Design students from the College for Creative Studies (CCS) in Detroit, Michigan.

This competition requires CCS design students to explore innovative ways to incorporate bright finishes as a premium design element related to SUV's and the Chrysler brand image, a brand that gave new meaning to Urban Luxury with its Chrysler 300 luxury sedan.

"CCS greatly values our long-standing partnership with NASF and Chrysler. Over the years, both industry leaders have provided opportunities for undergraduate students to apply their talents to exciting design projects," said Alexander Klatt, MFA Chair of Transportation Design. "This semester, however, they have combined efforts to engage with the MFA Transportation Design faculty in CCS Graduate Studies where they will challenge the MFA students to create a new 'luxury SUV brand concept' for Chrysler through the application of premium materials. The classroom will simulate the immersive experience of working in a professional studio with feedback and evaluation from NASF and Chrysler."

Design students will study ways to re-establish the Chrysler 300 as a luxury-SUV, differentiated from its American counterparts as well as European and Asian luxury brand. Participants will be required to work within strict, realistic guidelines. Time management skills will play a role due to critical deadlines placed throughout the intense, 12 week competition. Final designs will be chosen by a select panel of industry leaders in late April of this year. Contest awards will then be applied directly to the winning students' tuition.

"The future of surface finishing depends on the innovative ideas of our youth", stated NASF Board President, Rick Delawder. "The NASF strongly believes that it is the responsibility of those currently serving this industry to foster and nourish these ideas" stated, Delawder. This program is produced as part of the association's Surface Technology Initiative to proactively promote the surface finishing industry.


What's the Going Rate for Allowances These Days?
ST. LOUIS, MO, (SLFP.com), January 19, 2014 - For many of us it was our first source of income, and the first time we experienced the agonizing choice between small bursts of instant gratification versus the long game for saving for something special.

Half of Americans (50%) say they received an allowance when they were growing up, and among those with children ages four to 17, six in 10 (60%) say their children receive one. But what's the going rate on an allowance these days? And who's the most generous when it comes to deciding what's an appropriate weekly payout?

These are some of the results of The Harris Poll® of 2,311 adults surveyed online between December 11 and 17, 2013 by Harris Interactive.

Early childhood income gaps

When asked what they feel is an appropriate weekly allowance for children in three different age groups (4-9, 10-13 and 14-17), it is perhaps not surprising that appropriate allowance levels grow as children age (from $4.10 to $8.70 to $16.00, respectively), though it may surprise some to see that it in fact roughly doubles with each progression from one age category to the next.

Moreover, there are some distinct shifts between how different groups of Americans perceive what constitutes an "appropriate" allowance:

For all three age categories, Echo Boomers (Americans ages 18-36) and Gen Xers (ages 37-48) are more generous in their assessments than their elders; Baby Boomers (ages 49-67), in turn, report higher appropriate allowance levels than Matures (ages 68+):

For 4-9 year olds - $5.10 Echo Boomers, $5.40 Gen Xers, $3.10 Baby Boomers, $2.00 Matures.
For 10-13 year olds - $10.60, $10.10, $7.30 and $5.40, respectively.
For 14-17 year olds - $18.00, $18.80, $14.00 and $11.60, respectively.
Men consistently are looser with the purse strings than women:

For 4-9 year olds - $4.70 men, $3.50 women.
For 10-13 year olds - $9.90 men, $7.60 women.
For 14-17 year olds - $17.90 men, $14.20 women.

Those with children in their households appear more generous than those without for kids ages 4-13:

For 4-9 year olds - $5.20 with, $3.60 without.
For 10-13 year olds - $9.80 with, $8.20 without.

Republicans may not live up to the "Party of 'No!'" title their political rivals have been pushing, but they do have lower "appropriate" allowance thresholds than Democrats for 10-17 year olds:

For 10-13 year olds - $7.60 Republicans, $9.50 Democrats, $8.70 Independents.
For 14-17 year olds - $14.10 Republicans, $17.50 Democrats, $16.00 Independents.

Some corporations take the local cost of living into account when deciding on their employees' compensation and it would appear that allowances can be subject to this line of thinking as well. Urban Americans project a higher "appropriate" allowance than their Rural counterparts and a higher rate than either Suburbanites or Rurals for 10-17 year olds, in keeping with those regions' respective costs of living:

For 4-9 year olds - $4.30 Urban, $4.30 Suburban, $3.30 Rural.
For 10-13 year olds - $10.00 Urban, $8.60 Suburban, $7.40 Rural.
For 14-17 year olds - $18.30 Urban, $15.70 Suburban, $14.00 Rural.
Interestingly, Americans' household income, of all things, shows little relationship with what they believe allowance levels should be.

Earn it!

Though Americans overall appear to see allowances as appropriate across age ranges, that's not to say they think kids should be given money for nothing. While nine in ten (90%) believe an allowance is an important way for a child to learn about money, the same percentage (90%) feel that if a teenager wants to make money, he or she should get a job, and nearly as many (86%) say that children should only get an allowance when they work for it (doing household chores, for example).

Additionally, nearly three-fourths each believe that bad behavior should be taken out of a child's allowance in some way (74%) and that children shouldn't expect to get paid just for helping around the house (73%).

This last sentiment, that helping out around the house is not, in and of itself, worthy of compensation, is especially strong among Baby Boomers and Matures (68% Echo Boomers, 69% Gen Xers, 77% Baby Boomers, 81% Matures).


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Archived Stories:
Red DotWizard of Oz-themed Event Draws 600-Plus Library Supporters
Red Dot'Stay Enchanted' at Annual Thurtene Carnival on WUSTL's Campus
Red DotNew Line Theatre Offers Musical Theater Scholarship
Red DotSaint Louis Zoo Offers Summer Education Programs for Kids
Red DotAnimal Adventures Summer Day Camps with the Humane Society of Missouri
Red DotTeens Build Robots to Showcase at FIRST® Robotic Competition
Red DotMissouri Gaming Association Invites Project 21 Scholarship Submissions
Red DotGrants Awarded for the Maritz Arts and Education Fund for Teachers


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Moore Design Group The Saint Louis Front Page is owned and maintained by the Moore Design Group for the sole purpose of disseminating news and information about the Metropolitan Saint Louis area. Text or graphics may not be copied, rewritten or distributed in any manner whatsoever without written permission. For more information, contact editor@slfp.com All rights reserved world wide © 1996 - 2014 Moore Design Group.
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